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December 09, 2008

Comments

zfCdad lkpltjak kotxskwr umsaicum

cNGpUb mhnihrdy pibmhxnk mibkbluk

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Hi There, I found your website on https://www.altsviatsa.com Altsviatsa, does it support Firefox?

Hi There, I found your website on Altsviatsa, does it support Firefox?

Hi There, I found your website on Altsviatsa, does it support Firefox?

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Hi There, I found your website on https://www.lycoas.com Lycoas, does it support Firefox?

Hi There, I found your website on Lycoas, does it support Firefox?

Hi There, I found your website on Lycoas, does it support Firefox?

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Hi, It's the second time i'm posting you without a reply. I found your site using Yaehoo, does your site support firefox?

Dan,

I was first introduced to the conscious competence model as the stages of Zen practice, and I use it often in my (non-Zen) teaching. It lends itself to a circular progression, rather than the Z you've drawn. The nice thing about the circle is that Unconscious Competence flows right back into Unconscious Incompetence, the Child's Mind in Zen philosophy. Others have called that Reflective Competence, and there is an interesting diagram about 1/3 of the way down this page: https://www.businessballs.com/consciouscompetencelearningmodel.htm

Dan

You mention "wisdom". I've always liked this:

"Wisdom is a putting together, knowledge a taking apart. Wisdom synthesizes and integrates, knowledge analyzes and differentiates. From "The Power of Limits" by Gyorgy Doczi

So, when you know what you know (Unconscious Competence) you have achieved wisdom. Maybe.

I have seen a paradigm like this from the educational world that suggests there are four steps to learning.

1. Unconscious Incompetence
2. Conscious Incompetence
3. Conscious Competence
4. Unconscious Competence

Hi Dan. Your visual translation is very interesting. I'd like to add to your view by saying that the classic cycle has got some variations in cognitive learning theory:
ydktydn (beginner) -> yktydn (student) -> yktyk (practitioner)-> ydktyk (expert)
My point is that, when you ask expert about their skills, their skills are so integrated that they don't even remember why they are doing things this way. You may also find this kind of cycle in situational leadership.
best regards.

Dan, I loved your book, your blog, and this post. I wonder what the implications are for this to education. Both teachers and learners could benefit from understanding how your drawing represents stages of learning and mastery. If teacher and student were clear, then there might be less confusion about why there is, well, confusion. It is part of learning.

The visual aspect of it is powerful because as we know, Vision Is King.

Dan,

I've always loved that quote. I really enjoyed your post and your drawings.

I can see a new book in this... Famous Quotes... illustrated on the Back of the Napkin.

Mike

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